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Anxiety Basics


Anxiety - What is It
Anxiety Cause
Anxiety Symptoms
Anxiety Treatment

Anxiety Disorders


Agoraphobia
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Acute Stress Disorder
Comorbidity
Seperation Anxiety
Anxiety Neurosis
Demoralisation
Tourette's Syndrome
Generalised Anxiety Disorder
Phobic Anxiety Disorder
Hypochondriasis

Tourette's Syndrome (TS)


Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, stereotyped, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. Tics are sudden, repetitive, purposeless motor or vocal expressions or movements. An anxiety disorder, however, involves an excessive or inappropriate state of arousal characterized by feelings of apprehension, uncertainty, or fear. Tics are abrupt, purposeless, and involuntary vocal sounds or muscular jerks. Symptoms of TD usually begin between the ages of five and 10 years of age, and usually begin with mild, simple tics involving the face, head, or arms. TS occurs in people from all ethnic groups; males are affected about three to four times more often than females. It is estimated that 200,000 Americans have the most severe form of TS, and as many as one in 100 exhibit milder and less complex symptoms such as chronic motor or vocal tics or transient tics of childhood. Certain physical experiences can trigger or worsen tics, for example tight collars may trigger neck tics, or hearing another person sniff or throat-clear may trigger similar sounds.

The anxiety response is often not attributable to a real threat; nevertheless it can still paralyze the individual into inaction or withdrawal. An anxiety disorder also persists, while a healthy response to a threat resolves once the threat is removed. The severity is measured by the symptoms' frequency, complexity and the degree to which they cause impairment or disruption of the patient's ongoing activities and daily life. The word is derived from the Latin, angere , which means to choke or strangle. The anxiety response is often not attributable to a real threat; nevertheless it can still paralyze the individual into inaction or withdrawal. An anxiety disorder persists, while a healthy response to a threat resolves, once the threat is removed. Although TS can be a chronic condition with symptoms lasting a lifetime, most people with the condition experience their worst symptoms in their early teens, with improvement occurring in the late teens and continuing into adulthood.